Hugo Ceron-Anaya

Hugo Ceron-Anaya
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
31 Williams Drive, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015
610-758-3627

 

Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Essex (UK), 2009
Interests: 
The Body / Embodiment; Social Theory; Wealth / Privilege; Globalization; Latin America; Latin@s; Class, Race, and Gender.

 

Summary

Hugo Ceron-Anaya is an Assistant Professor of Sociology. His research interests intersect three broader fields: the sociology of the body / embodiment; sociological theory; and, the sociology of wealth / privilege.

Ceron-Anaya received a BA in History by the National University of Mexico in 1998. He studied a MA in Sociology at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom in 2002, and stayed to complete a PhD in Sociology in the same institution.  

 

Research Interests

He is interested in developing a sociological understanding of power that captures the multiple ways in which power shapes life opportunities. In doing so, he wants to examine how class, race, gender and sexuality articulate a set of structures of subordination that impact life trajectories in a myriad of combinations. He argues that a more complex understanding of power and domination will help us to explain why communal action against social inequalities is hard to achieve and even sometimes opposed by excluded communities. 

Ceron-Anaya is currently working on a book manuscript analyzing the interlocking relation of class, gender, and racial structures and its influence in the life chances of the individuals who constitute the wealthy world of golf in contemporary Mexico City. He argues that the affluent universe of golf represents a strategic site to demonstrate how multiple layers of privilege, and lack-of-privilege, are bodily internalized by individuals and social groups. Through an ethnographic examination of golf clubs in Mexico City and its upper-middle- and upper-class members, as well as their lower-class workers, this book elucidates how social structures strongly influence social action.

 

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